Fiji Six Pence
A circulating silver coin with a sea turtle on it! Unique among world coin issues.
Default cover option is green.
  • George V
  • 1934, Proof
  • 1934
  • 1935, Proof
  • 1935
  • 1936, Proof
  • 1936
  • George VI
  • 1937, Proof
  • 1937
  • 1938, Proof
  • 1938
  • 1940, Proof
  • 1940
  • 1941, Proof
  • 1941
  • 1942-S
  • 1943-S
  • Elizabeth II
  • 1953, Proof
  • 1953
  • 1958, Proof
  • 1958
  • 1961, Proof
  • 1961
  • 1962, Proof
  • 1962
  • 1965
  • 1967

Slots Per Page

  • 25
  • 20
  • 16
  • 12
  • 9

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Fiji 6 Pence
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Fiji 6 Pence 6 Pence Fiji Six Pence Six Pence Fiji Sixpence Sixpence

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Fiji
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Fiji
6 Pence
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Six Pence
Fiji
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About Fiji

Approximately 150 million years ago, the seafloor of the Pacific Ocean gave way to volcanic activity. The ensuing eruptions mounted to the surface and generated an archipelago containing hundreds of islands and islets. About 3,000 years ago, the first human settlers arrived on the island chain that would become known as Fiji.

The Lapita culture was the first to make its mark on the tropical lands. They made pottery and canoes and engaged in trade with neighboring cultures. A new people, the Melanesians, eventually came to these islands and established themselves while spreading their culture to other places including Tonga, Samoa, and possibly Hawaii as well. The practice of building canoes and trade remained.
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About Fiji

Approximately 150 million years ago, the seafloor of the Pacific Ocean gave way to volcanic activity. The ensuing eruptions mounted to the surface and generated an archipelago containing hundreds of islands and islets. About 3,000 years ago, the first human settlers arrived on the island chain that would become known as Fiji.

The Lapita culture was the first to make its mark on the tropical lands. They made pottery and canoes and engaged in trade with neighboring cultures. A new people, the Melanesians, eventually came to these islands and established themselves while spreading their culture to other places including Tonga, Samoa, and possibly Hawaii as well. The practice of building canoes and trade remained.

Album Summary